Give the Gift of Motivation and Inspiration!


Give the Gift of Motivation and Inspiration!

What could be better than passing on your enthusiasm!

The best is yet to come!

click here http://www.brucewconner.com

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Faster as a Master Your best is yet to come!

 

 

 

 

Balance and Priorities


Book signing in Kildeer went very well yesterday with about 30 people attending.  Next event is Saturday 1/24/2015  11am to 1pm at the Road Runner Sports in Naperville, IL

Balance is a fine art.  In speed skating, a 1.1 milimeter blade is the point of contact with the ice. To master balance is the first priority.  Proper skating position, adding power, then repeat with tempo, generating speed.  Managing energy from the fast twitch muscle fibers for the start, acceleration, and high-speed turns, to the slow twitch fibers to keep me in the lowest position for maximum power and efficiency.

These principles are universal to any endeavor physical, mental, etc.

Falls happen to the best of us every now and then.  By pushing limits, chances are greater of a fall but the rewards are higher too.

Falling is part of life, so is pain.  Off balance, out of focus, inefficient, unproductive, exposed to injury and disease.  Balance is just the opposite, focused, productive, efficient, healthy, happy, content and serene.  More sensitive to being off-balance today, I can make necessary more easily now.

learning process like anything else, the benefits are applicable to all areas of my life.  Since they affect all areas of my life then I must give balance the priority that it deserves, top.  Most of us spend about 90% of our time looking over the edge, focusing on the problems to balance. By finding out what works, keep doing it, refining it little by little is the best formula for success.

Priorities are the foundation of good decision-making.  Keeping my priorities straight, with good judgements about where I am, my goals, and how to get there.  If I am confused about my decisions by revisiting my priorities, the decisions become clearer.  Priorities in the order of God first, family second, work third and recreation fourth.

Ever know a few people who are very busy but always seem to have time for the most important things?  This is an example of having priorities straight.  Anything that is urgent, is rarely important, and anything that is important is rarely urgent.  Timing of my actions is just as important as the action itself.

Clear goals, balance, priorities, all help to establish the landscape.  Confident, focused, productive, efficient, happy, healthy, serene, trusting the path.

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Goals Part 2 of 2: Three Essential Elements


Upcoming book signing appearance:

Where?

Road Runner Sports

20291 N Rand Rd, #105

Kildeer, IL 60047 847-719-8949

When?

Saturday 1/1/7/2015   11am-1pm

Please come by and share your stories!

Goals must have three essential elements.  Specific, measurable, and have a time frame.  Short range is a few months.  Medium range, a year or two, and long-range is 5 years or more.  The longer the time frame the greater the chance of change.  Breaking down the short range into even shorter time frames such as weekly, daily, or even, moment by moment can be done too.  Set goals through an event.  Have another goal beyond that event to transition too right away.  Savor the achievement, celebrate the event, have a continuous path forward.  This prevents any down time emotionally after the achievement.  It is important to rest.  Evaluate after the achievement so that course corrections can be made.  After the goal is achieved perspective changes in ways we cannot predict.  This is the time to set a new path with a new perspective.

Sticking to a goal regardless of the circumstances is dangerous.  When the ego takes over, we are now slaves to the goal.  Who is driving, me or the goal?

After the achievement of the goal, it is very important to recognize the milestone.  This can be done in a number of ways.  Many families have rituals about celebrating goal achievements.  Going out to dinner, having a party, etc.  Remembering very vividly after qualifying for the Olympic trials in December of 2005 at age 49, what I did.  Made some phone calls to share the achievement,  then looked myself in the mirror and proclaimed to myself  “I am good enough!”  That was a very important moment for me and I frequently remember it.  It is now part of a solid foundation of my own self esteem.

Another facet about goals is that they do not have to be linear.  Change based on the individual changing, the environment, or circumstances, are a sign of maturity and the ability to change with new conditions.  Goals evolve as we change.

Right now is a great time to review your short, medium, and long-range goals.  Taking an overview monthly helps to adjust and affirm.  Peace, serenity, progress, and change are the result when using the indispensable tool of goals.  Use it wisely and the benefits are greater than you can imagine.  Breaking down barriers, one at a time.  Courage is measured one step at a time.

Getting better and going faster is more about intention and choices than age.

Go For It!!!  You can do it!!!  Start NOW!!!

First step off the line……….

photo by Jerry Search

photo by Jerry Search

Rest, Reevaluation, and Goal Setting


Rest, reevaluation, and Goal setting

For winter competitive athletes this is a time of peak training.  For those that compete mostly in the summer this is the time for rest, reflection and reevaluation of our future goals and direction.

Rest is just what it says, rest from activity. Rest is either passive or active. There are many parts to rest. I will address them in different contexts. Normal training consists of a few different cycles. The largest context is the four-year Olympic cycle. The shift in focus will change from year to year as the Olympic year approaches. As I change and my goals change, so will my rest requirements change.
Within the Olympic cycle is the yearly cycle that every competitive athlete goes through. The yearly cycle must include periods of rest. I generally finish my competitive season in the middle of March. I then take at least six to eight weeks off of training. During this time, it is important to let my body and mind heal from the intense work I did over the past ten months or so. I take a break in many ways, like catching up on the things I have put off due to my competition and training schedule. I am less active physically; this is my winter. I let the field rest so it can produce again later with more abundance, just as farmers do for their crops. During this time, I can do a number of things. One thing I like to do is to continue a little very easy biking and stretching.
I do nothing intense, everything just for fun! When I was growing up, my parents stressed that I should learn my sport the best I could, but also learn sports I could do for life. For example, I learned to play golf and tennis, and I still enjoy them today. Doing other sports will help me be a better skater because I will have a better, more rounded foundation to draw from. The important principle in active rest is to keep the intensity low. When I am ready to start the training cycle over again, my body and mind will tell me. I cannot force the issue! Starting back too soon or too fast will cause me to burn out again or get injured.
Because I am used to a lot of physical activity, stopping cold turkey will throw me off. It is still important to be active, just not as much and without any real intensity. My body needs the rest, and I must give in to it or suffer in the long run.
One very important element in my training regimen is periodic massage. Muscles need help to recover. One way to assist in recovery is massage. In order to keep up my training volume, I need recovery. The more quickly I recover, the more training volume and intensity are possible. My race results directly correspond to my training volume and intensity. I do self-massage and get great results. I use foam rollers, my hands, and a stick roller for self massage. I also hire a professional masseuse sometimes. I have a pretty good understanding of my own body and what it is going through, but using a trained massage professional brings another helpful dimension to my recovery.
Usually a massage therapist can find hot spots that I was not even aware of. After the therapist has found these spots and worked on them, my body then spends less energy on a “wound” and more energy on my general recovery. Ideally, a massage every week would be the best for me, but that is not always possible or practical.
Another tool that I use to gauge whether I am training to an optimum level is ithlete. I heard about ithlete from a fellow speed skater, researched it, and decided that this was something that might help me decide when to go hard and when to back off on my training. The ithlete device is an application on my smart phone that uses a receiver and my polar heart monitor to measure heart rate variability. I take a measurement immediately after waking in the morning to gauge my readiness to train hard that day. Illness and stress in my life will give me low numbers and tell me that I need rest or to train more easily that day. It reflects all of my life factors, including a very high training load. In the past, I would train right through these times, and my racing suffered as a result. This tool can give me physical feedback and validates the feelings I get when I am on track or over-trained.
When I look at my monthly and yearly training plan, I must plan my rest accordingly. Through trial and error, I have found that after working hard for three weeks I must reduce my intensity and volume and do an active rest week. I will decrease my intensity and volume for a week, so that I may avoid burn out or injury. In the weekly plan, I also include a rest day, usually Sunday. During the week, I will space my intense training out so that there are no two days in a row without a rest or recovery day. For instance, skating is like doing a hard weight workout. I will not do weights one day, then skate the next. That would be counterproductive. I will do a cardio bike recovery workout, swimming, or yoga in between skating and weights. In training, as in life, keeping everything in balance is the key to making progress.

By continually reevaluation our plans and adapting to changed circumstances, we can uncover new ways to enjoy the journey and achieve our goals.

The importance of goal setting cannot be underestimated. Impossible dreams are accomplished when focusing on goals you can control. Many of our goals are unspoken, they are motivations just under the surface. It is important to get those goals out in the open. There is some risk with that. By telling someone about my goals, even admitting it to myself, then I am responsible and accountable for them. This can be daunting and scary. The goal can be a stretch, the risk is outside of my comfort zone, exposure is tough. By starting towards my goal, if it seems to be unrealistic, then changing my goal is necessary. It is ok to change goals and directions. Sometimes life demands it. When change is needed that I resisted, there was a lesson for me. Life threw me a curve, adapt or suffer the consequences.

Having no target or direction, I will surely hit something, exactly what I do not want. By having a goal, a direction or a target, adjustments are easy. Enjoying the forward motion of my journey as well the direction, hitting my goal because of focus. If the original goal was not where I wanted to go, at least I have made progress in determining my eventual outcome and am farther down the road. It is also important to look at the expectations of my goals and to realize they are my goals, no one but mine. They are my creation. If they become a burden then I must look deeper to the motivation behind the goals. The goal may really belong to someone else. Focusing on goals that leave me feeling recharged rather than drained.

There are a number of steps to take to set up my goals. First I must know what drives me. What I am passionate about? What are my priorities and how I can fulfill them? Joy and passion will keep me coming back to completion of a goal or a positive change for a lifetime.

I have a passion for skating, and skating well. It requires a great deal of work and I am willing to do it. A passion for flying, doing it well, it shows there too. Keeping focused on passion and joy, see where it takes me. With these principles in mind, I can set short, medium and long-term goals.

My goals must be admitted by me first. Then I must announce them out loud. Then they must be shared with others that are important to my success. This can be difficult, but in order to move forward there must not be seen and unseen roadblocks to progress. There are many conscious and unconscious barriers to progress. By recognizing them as they come up, ignoring them, going around, or over them.

Goals must be realistic, measurable, have definite time frames, reviewed from time to time, and adjusted as necessary. Goals are classified as short, medium, and long-range. If one of my goals is to build self-esteem through setting and achieving goals, then I must do esteem-able things. The direction and end are important, but ultimately it is the journey that is the most valuable.

Put your feet up, rest, reevaluate and set new goals.

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Your best is yet to come!


I have changed the mission statement for this blog.  I understand better what you want.  For the last two plus years I have written this blog outlining what I have done and how I did it thereby building a case.  Then I outlined the methods of thinking to making progress.  Finally I have shown you what are the tools to carry out your plans.

You can read my blog and past posts to get the outline of my proven methods (free).  You can also buy my book to get additional details and stories that color my path (print and e-books).

Tell us what you have to say about your journey so we can all be inspired, hopefull, and motivated!

Training Principles Part 6: Stretching


Training Principles Part 6: Stretching

Book update:  I am anticipating printing of the paperback and shipping to me arriving by 9/24.  Electronic versions may be available sooner.  I will update again soon.

Stretching, or you can call it mobility, has three uses for me, warm-up, cool down, and a separate yoga workout.

The first is during my warm-up process.  I have a repeatable routine so that I remember all of my stretches.  Creat one that works for you and modify it as you see fit.

I never stretch cold muscles, ligaments, or tendons. I bring my body up to a warm temperature by jogging, biking, or fast walking, then I stretch to get full range of motion of my joints. I like to think of my muscles as rubber bands. If I stretch a cold rubber band, it might break; a warm one is more flexible. When stretching for range of motion, I will hold a pose for about 10 seconds.

The second aspect of my stretching is after my cool down. The same routine but this time I will hold my poses for 30 seconds. The purpose of this kind of stretch is to increase flexibility, promote recovery, and prevent injury.

The third and last component is a workout designed just around stretching. Yoga is a great tool for me, so I try to do it weekly. Spending a whole hour stretching has benefits that go far beyond just flexibility, injury prevention, and range of motion. Yoga can help me open up the connection from my head to my heart, help me be mind-full and calm, and get re-charged and re-centered.  When I look forward to yoga and miss it when I can’t seem to fit it in , then I know its benefits are beyond the obvious.

I also have a daily appiontment with my “stick” roller.  By using my stick or some type of roller I can get to specific problem areas and work out soreness, promote circulation that helps recovery and increase flexibility immediately adjacent to joints.  There is some new proof that “rolling” is better than stretching for increased flexibility.  I am disciplined about doing all the above and it clearly works for me.

Next week is mental training.

Yoga pose

Yoga pose

Yoga for Training and Recovery.


Yoga for Training and Recovery.

Since the Olympic trials in late December I have not been training intensely.  I train when I feel like it and do what I feel like doing.  I let my intuition guide me.  My focus has shifted dramatically.  After pushing hard for 9 consecutive seasons I have switched gears.

I have been working on my book a great deal and I am getting very close to publishing.  The last editing is being done now.  I will make an announcement soon as to the availability in print and electronically.

After the Olympic trials in late December I gradually decreased my volume and intensity of training.  If I stop suddenly my body revolts and I end up getting sick or injured.  I build up slowly and decrease slowly.

I have been conentrating on other things that are important in my life, consistent with my priorities.  Family, publishing my book, changing back to the 747 and consistent flights to Shanghai and Tokyo, and yard work is the current mix.

Biking, weights, easy jogging on a treadmill, yoga and yardwork are what I have been doing for physical stimulation.  Picking up a guitar and exploring music is possible when I do not train full time as well.

I have been drawn to yoga this spring for many reasons and the many benefits it offers.  Strength, flexibility, mindfulness, relaxation, etc.

Yoga for recovery and training is just what I need right now and when I feel the need I listen.

I hope you all have a great summer of training!

Yoga pose

Yoga pose