Give the Gift of Motivation and Inspiration!


Give the Gift of Motivation and Inspiration!

What could be better than passing on your enthusiasm!

The best is yet to come!

click here http://www.brucewconner.com

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Faster as a Master Your best is yet to come!

 

 

 

 

How to start your best season ever!


Book signing Road Runner Sports, Wilmette, IL Saturday 1/31/2015 11am to 1pm.

How to start your best season ever!

This is a guide to getting started to have your best training and competition season ever.

First, did you rest, reflect, and recover from last season?  Are you ready to get started for the long haul?

Next, here are the steps required.

Set your intention.  Make your choices.

Outline an overall plan.  Your goals must be specific, measurable, and have a time frame.  Look at the entire season, then work backward to your training and preparations.  Start with the framework, then get specific.  Plan by the month, week, day, then each task in the workout.  Be flexible with the plan, it will change.

Get your network together for support.  Enlist the people around you that you need for help.  Tell them your plans.

Get your equipment together.  This includes what you need to compete, and train.  Remember to include good nutrition.

Enlist a coach or schedule some camps and clinics to learn more about your sport and competing.  Study training methods of other successful athletes that you know.  Do what works.  Do not reinvent the wheel.

Sign up for the competitions as soon as possible, book air travel, hotel rooms, rental cars, etc, now.  Make the committment.

Train as if you are competing.

Stay balanced in your efforts.  Start slow and build.  Keep your priorities straight.

Remember to attend to your emotional needs, they are just as important as the physical.  Schedule, yoga, meditation, etc, to keep balanced on the emotional side.  Rehearse your competition mentally so you are prepared to execute to the best of your ability.  See yourself accomplishing your achievements. Have visible reminders of the goals you have set.

Exercise courage in starting your plan.  The journey of a thousand miles begins with the first step. Start walking…

Set your intention.  Make your choices.  Execute your plan.  You will get the results you work for.

Good luck on your journey, have the best season ever!

I have posted about each one of these subjects in detail in the last several months.  Check out my archives of past posts.

Photo by Jerry Search

Photo by Jerry Search

Training Principles Part 6: Stretching


Training Principles Part 6: Stretching

Book update:  I am anticipating printing of the paperback and shipping to me arriving by 9/24.  Electronic versions may be available sooner.  I will update again soon.

Stretching, or you can call it mobility, has three uses for me, warm-up, cool down, and a separate yoga workout.

The first is during my warm-up process.  I have a repeatable routine so that I remember all of my stretches.  Creat one that works for you and modify it as you see fit.

I never stretch cold muscles, ligaments, or tendons. I bring my body up to a warm temperature by jogging, biking, or fast walking, then I stretch to get full range of motion of my joints. I like to think of my muscles as rubber bands. If I stretch a cold rubber band, it might break; a warm one is more flexible. When stretching for range of motion, I will hold a pose for about 10 seconds.

The second aspect of my stretching is after my cool down. The same routine but this time I will hold my poses for 30 seconds. The purpose of this kind of stretch is to increase flexibility, promote recovery, and prevent injury.

The third and last component is a workout designed just around stretching. Yoga is a great tool for me, so I try to do it weekly. Spending a whole hour stretching has benefits that go far beyond just flexibility, injury prevention, and range of motion. Yoga can help me open up the connection from my head to my heart, help me be mind-full and calm, and get re-charged and re-centered.  When I look forward to yoga and miss it when I can’t seem to fit it in , then I know its benefits are beyond the obvious.

I also have a daily appiontment with my “stick” roller.  By using my stick or some type of roller I can get to specific problem areas and work out soreness, promote circulation that helps recovery and increase flexibility immediately adjacent to joints.  There is some new proof that “rolling” is better than stretching for increased flexibility.  I am disciplined about doing all the above and it clearly works for me.

Next week is mental training.

Yoga pose

Yoga pose

The Zen of Intense Training


The Zen of Intense Training.  To be zen, enlightened, in a state of total focus where mind and body are together.  This is my journey.

Having trained for many years I can recall many times I have reached this state of zen.  A long run in the forest on a trail, a hard stair workout by a waterfall, a leisurely bike ride after the end of a hard skate.

This is what I strive for.  It is the joy of the work itself.  My head, body and heart are one.

When the intensity is cranked up, I feel it.  Being totally focused on the task, this is when it works.  When racing, I am totally focused.  By training this way I am preparing for the intense race conditions.  Train to race, race like I train.  This is the connection of all of me and the Zen of intense work.

Keeping my priorities straight for this intense work is the key.  When I train, I train hard.  I work up to it gradually within each workout as well as over the course of my season and years.

The payoff is incredible.  Making progress is very rewarding.  The way I feel during and after make the work a joy.

Having trouble with being able to train hard?  If you need to prioritize, take out the volume and put in the intensity.  Work up to it gradually, and enjoy the zen of intense training.

Stair climbing at the waterfall near Inzell Germany

Stair climbing at the waterfall near Inzell Germany

Yoga for Training and Recovery.


Yoga for Training and Recovery.

Since the Olympic trials in late December I have not been training intensely.  I train when I feel like it and do what I feel like doing.  I let my intuition guide me.  My focus has shifted dramatically.  After pushing hard for 9 consecutive seasons I have switched gears.

I have been working on my book a great deal and I am getting very close to publishing.  The last editing is being done now.  I will make an announcement soon as to the availability in print and electronically.

After the Olympic trials in late December I gradually decreased my volume and intensity of training.  If I stop suddenly my body revolts and I end up getting sick or injured.  I build up slowly and decrease slowly.

I have been conentrating on other things that are important in my life, consistent with my priorities.  Family, publishing my book, changing back to the 747 and consistent flights to Shanghai and Tokyo, and yard work is the current mix.

Biking, weights, easy jogging on a treadmill, yoga and yardwork are what I have been doing for physical stimulation.  Picking up a guitar and exploring music is possible when I do not train full time as well.

I have been drawn to yoga this spring for many reasons and the many benefits it offers.  Strength, flexibility, mindfulness, relaxation, etc.

Yoga for recovery and training is just what I need right now and when I feel the need I listen.

I hope you all have a great summer of training!

Yoga pose

Yoga pose

 

Stress


Stress is a normal part of everyday life.  When people say that, I hate it.  Stress is either self-created, on purpose, or it is created outside of me, and I must choose a response to it.  The stress that I feel before a race is my creation.  I choose to race.  It can be frightening and rewarding just the same.  I have control over this stress.  It’s the stuff I have no control over that drives me nuts.

The stress I did not have a hand in creating is what I have trouble with.  My stress level is usually contingent on my mental state.  When I am doing well, balanced,at peace, and at ease, I can handle a great deal of stress.  If I am not doing well, just a little extra stress puts me over the edge.  Relief is what I need.  We all deal with stress in our lives.  If I give it power, stress will be in charge and rule me.  It is my choice.  My response is what I have control over.

Developing practice on how to handle stress is the key.  I won’t be very good at it until I have been successful at handling some easy situations first.  Then with some experience I can handle tougher situations.  How I deal with traffic is usually a pretty good barometer for me and how I am handling stress in my life.  If I have a short fuse and everyone seems to be driving poorly around me, then I must look at myself.  Am I being overly sensitive about my surroundings?  Am I feeling threatened at every turn?  Then I must look at how I am handling my stress.  What are the underlying problems in my life?  It is not the traffic that is the problem but how am I responding to the traffic.  I heard a story about a guy who typically drives a great deal in rush hour traffic.  When asked by a friend how he handles all the traffic his response was, “I only drive one car”  This reminds me that I only need to control my response to the stress.  Traffic is one way I can see how I am handling stress.  That is the mirror that I need to look at, to see what is really going on with me, honestly.

So now that I have been able to recognize the stress level, what do I do with it?  Usually my stress comes out in anger.  Sometimes I bury it and it affects me physically by making me sick (dis-ease).  By learning how to deal with my anger I can manage my stress.  Physical activity helps with my anger.  A long run, chopping down a tree, yoga, meditation, are some examples of physical things I can do to facilitate healing.  That is probably why I train so hard.   This is a productive and healthy way to deal with my stress.  I have also learned ( this was very hard for me) to defuse my anger slowly instead of going from zero to rage.  Using my networks of support and getting help for my mental and emotional state, is what works. By knowing I am not alone in my struggles helps as well.  After building confidence handling my stress, I can deal with anything that comes my way.

With a lower stress level I rest better, am healthier, recover faster, and am able to train harder.

Sometimes I just need to take the lead from my dog, let go, run, and be happy.

Lilly my smiling off ice training partner.

Lilly my smiling off ice training partner.