Give the Gift of Motivation and Inspiration!


Give the Gift of Motivation and Inspiration!

What could be better than passing on your enthusiasm!

The best is yet to come!

click here http://www.brucewconner.com

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Faster as a Master Your best is yet to come!

 

 

 

 

How to start your best season ever!


Book signing Road Runner Sports, Wilmette, IL Saturday 1/31/2015 11am to 1pm.

How to start your best season ever!

This is a guide to getting started to have your best training and competition season ever.

First, did you rest, reflect, and recover from last season?  Are you ready to get started for the long haul?

Next, here are the steps required.

Set your intention.  Make your choices.

Outline an overall plan.  Your goals must be specific, measurable, and have a time frame.  Look at the entire season, then work backward to your training and preparations.  Start with the framework, then get specific.  Plan by the month, week, day, then each task in the workout.  Be flexible with the plan, it will change.

Get your network together for support.  Enlist the people around you that you need for help.  Tell them your plans.

Get your equipment together.  This includes what you need to compete, and train.  Remember to include good nutrition.

Enlist a coach or schedule some camps and clinics to learn more about your sport and competing.  Study training methods of other successful athletes that you know.  Do what works.  Do not reinvent the wheel.

Sign up for the competitions as soon as possible, book air travel, hotel rooms, rental cars, etc, now.  Make the committment.

Train as if you are competing.

Stay balanced in your efforts.  Start slow and build.  Keep your priorities straight.

Remember to attend to your emotional needs, they are just as important as the physical.  Schedule, yoga, meditation, etc, to keep balanced on the emotional side.  Rehearse your competition mentally so you are prepared to execute to the best of your ability.  See yourself accomplishing your achievements. Have visible reminders of the goals you have set.

Exercise courage in starting your plan.  The journey of a thousand miles begins with the first step. Start walking…

Set your intention.  Make your choices.  Execute your plan.  You will get the results you work for.

Good luck on your journey, have the best season ever!

I have posted about each one of these subjects in detail in the last several months.  Check out my archives of past posts.

Photo by Jerry Search

Photo by Jerry Search

My Skating Family


My Skating Family.

Back on the ice.  First time on blades since last March.

There is a cycle each year of training and racing, ending with the last race in March.  Beginning this season with time off and recovery, then easy training progressing to harder work with volume and intensity.

This is the stage when we skate again.  Based on my work schedule, skating 3 times per week is the optimum.  Weight training, stationary bike work for cardio and recovery, and yoga will fill in between the skating and work.

All athletes have support networks.  Part of my support network is my skating family.  We are a tribe of like-minded, dedicated people.  Since I train by myself most of the time, it is great to reconnect with my group.  This is the time we get to  catch up.  Having face time with my coach is great.  Connecting with Jeffrey, Brian and Nancy, Jr. and finding out how their summer has gone.  Facebook updates are great but looking into someones eyes is indispensable.

A great characteristic of my group is shared support.  We all have something to offer to the group and to help each other achieve our goals.  Support comes in many different forms, everybody brings something unique.  My wife Maripat provides the basic platform of support (essential) to me and our group, while taking photos, video, and adding encouragement, adjacent to the ice.

I am at home among my training group and coach.  Motivated to get better, faster, smoother, more efficient, always making progress.

Wobbly at first on my blades.  I relearn pretty quickly how to get that fine balance for skating.  Foreign and familiar at the same time, describe the first couple of times on the ice.  In the beginning it is only technical work.  Going fast and hard comes later.  Patience with the process and the stroke yields results.

Any day I can skate is a great day!

Any day I can be with my skating family is also a great day!

My Skating Family. L to R, Jeffrey Swider-Peltz, Nancy Swider- Peltz, Jr, Brian Hansen, Maripat Conner (wife), Bruce Conner, Nancy Swider-Peltz, Sr (Coach)

My Skating Family.
L to R, Jeffrey Swider-Peltz, Nancy Swider- Peltz, Jr, Brian Hansen, Maripat Conner (wife), Bruce Conner, Nancy Swider-Peltz, Sr (Coach)

Ice In August! Yes!!!


Ice In August!  Yes!!!

This is an Olympic year.  A special year.  Speed skating takes a main stage this year with the Olympic games in Sochi, Russia during February.  The Olympic trials also will be a main event for my sport.  There will be 13 hours of TV coverage between short track and long track events.  The long track trials start December 27th in Salt Lake City.  I will be racing the 500m on the 28th and the 1000m on the 29th.  The short track trials follow and are done on January 5th.

Since this an Olympic year we get ice early in Milwaukee.  In non Olympic years we get ice around the middle of September.  The US Olympic Committee helps the Pettit Center with the extra cost of opening early so we can train longer on the ice before the trials and the games.  This year we will have ice on August 15th.

Pumped about getting on the ice this year, training with my group of Olympians.   Getting to apply the off ice work to skating.  The weight workouts, the hard bike training, the slide-board, yoga, swimming, recovery, all working in harmony to apply to the ice skating that feeds my soul.

Loving every part of this process.  Refreshing cold. Smell of the ice.  Speed.  Wind in the ears.  Pressure into the ice while balancing on a 1.1 milimeter blade.  Back together with my skating family, coach, and training partners.  The physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual aspects of speed skating are what feed me.  I get to utilize all my tools for skating.  Building a network for support, goals, nutrition, coaching, training, competing, balance,  mental support, and courage all are in play.  Juggling all the pieces and getting the most out of the effort.  Being rewarded on  the journey my making me better.  Happy in doing this work, joyous in my pursuit of excellence, free in being totally absorbed in the moment.  Total concentration on skating, single-minded effort, peace in the knowledge of what is right for me.  Doing this work that feeds me.

Skating this week!

Masters Us Single Dist Championships January 2012, photo by Steve Penland

Masters Us Single Dist Championships January 2012, photo by Steve Penland

Goals 1


Goals 1

The importance of goal setting cannot be underestimated.  Impossible dreams are accomplished when focusing on goals you can control.  Many of our goals are unspoken, they are motivations just under the surface.  It is important to get those goals out in the open.  There is some risk with that.  By telling someone about my goals, even admitting it to myself, then I am responsible and accountable for them.  This can be daunting and scary.  The goal can be a stretch, the risk is outside of my comfort zone, exposure is tough.  By starting towards my goal, if it seems to be unrealistic, then changing my goal is necessary.  It is ok to change goals and directions.  Sometimes life demands it.  When change is needed that I resisted, there was a lesson for me.  Life threw me a curve, adapt or suffer the consequences.

Having no target or direction, I will surely hit something, exactly what I do not want.  By having a goal, a direction or a target, adjustments are easy.  Enjoying the forward motion of my journey as well the direction, hitting my goal because of focus.  If the original goal was not where I wanted to go, at least I have made progress in determining my eventual outcome and am farther down the road. It is also important to look at the expectations of my goals and to realize they are my goals, no one but mine.  They are my creation.  If they become a burden then I must look deeper to the motivation behind the goals.  The goal may really belong to someone else.  Focusing on goals that leave me feeling recharged rather than drained.

There are a number of steps to take to set up my goals.  First I must know what drives me.  What I am passionate about?  What are my priorities and how I can fulfill them?   Joy and passion will keep me coming back to completion of a goal or a positive change for a lifetime.

I have a passion for skating, and skating well.  It requires a great deal of work and I am willing to do it.  A passion for flying, doing it well, it shows there too.  Keeping focused on passion and joy, see where it takes me.  With these principles in mind, I can set short, medium and long-term goals.

My goals must be admitted by me first.  Then I must announce them out loud.  Then they must be shared with others that are important to my success.  This can be difficult, but in order to move forward there must not be seen and unseen roadblocks to progress.  There are many conscious and unconscious barriers to progress.  By recognizing them as they come up, ignoring them, going around, or over them.

Goals must be realistic, measurable, have definite time frames, reviewed from time to time, and adjusted as necessary.  Goals are classified as short, medium, and long-range.  If one of my goals is to build self-esteem through setting and achieving goals, then I must do esteem-able things.  The direction and end are important, but ultimately it is the journey that is the most valuable.

Training hard this week.  Getting the job done and doing the work to achieve my goals, enjoying the journey and my transformation.

Next weeks post will be a conclusion to my discussion about goals. Stay tuned…..

Steps to the goals

Steps to the goals

Training Intensity


When approaching the starting line this December for the Olympic trials, I will remember July.

My mantra that I repeat is:  Grateful to be here and skate, I have done the work, adjusting as I go, trusting to get the results I am supposed to have.

July:  I have done the work.

Having spent many years of working up to this, this is the peak of training volume and intensity.

Training everyday, working very hard, making progress.  The support system, preparation, food, equipment, coaching, sleep, recovery, therapy, all set me up to make progress.  Some of you race bikes, race and skate in-line, race triathlon, skate short track, etc.  Whatever it is you do, make it intense.  When approaching the starting line I remember the maximum effort bike ride,  the weight lifting to failure, the static skating position sits for many minutes.

My mental preparations are there for me in the last stages of my race.  When feeling the lactic acid hit my legs, when tunnel vision comes because of oxygen deprivation, I remember the intense work in July.  This is where the race is won.  The part of the journey that changes me into my better self.  Transformation by the work.  Revealing my true character and what I am on this earth to do.

Make it a great July with progress in volume and intensity. Serious, fun, and inspirational to others, be an example.

Can’t wait for ice in Milwaukee in 4 weeks.  Happy dance!!!

Resting with the satisfaction of a job well done, in the bank for the coming season.

Flying my first trip after finishing training on the B-777, onward and upward!

At the starting line

At the starting line

9 Tools To Breaking Down Barriers


9 Tools For Breaking Down Barriers

Breaking down barriers is essential to make progress, to grow, and live and thrive. Using these tools will give you the best chance for successful outcomes and a rewarding journey through life.

1. Building a network of support.

All successful people have support. Everyone needs help. Feeling self-reliant at times is important. The most successful people I know have support.

2. Goals

A necessary part of making progress is setting goals. Make your goals specific, realistic, and have a time frame. Changing your goals is ok, make the commitment by setting a goal and start your journey.

3. Nutrition

If you want to go fast you must put jet fuel in your tank. Give yourself the best chance by using the best raw materials for your mind and body.

4. Coaching

What ever your goals are, there is probably someone who has already done it. Get expert help. This will save a great deal of energy, time, and frustration.

5. Training

Practice what you do, physically, mentally, and emotionally. Build gradually your volume, and intensity. Have fun with it!

6. Competing

Competition brings out the real you. This can be scary at first. The most important competitor I face is myself. Embracing competition is extremely rewarding on many levels.

7. Balance

Learning to prioritize the different parts of my life helps to achieve and maintain balance. Good decision-making is the foundation of balance.

8. Mental support

My eyes only see out. Having another set of eyes and perspective can help me adjust my thinking. Sharing thoughts with someone I trust, I find out that my thinking is not so different. Everything starts with a thought, proper support is essential.

9. Courage

Are we worth it? Change is hard. We begin with the first step. If we keep climbing, look up every now and then, the view just gets better. Gratitude for the work can be its own reward. Doing hard things will reap untold benefits. Courage is doing all the little things and making progress. Before you know it you have broken down your own barriers.

On a personal note I am almost done with B-777 school in Denver. I will be flying between Chicago, Washington D.C. and Frankfurt Germany in July. Skating training is going well with solid progress in all areas. Looking forward to the Olympic trials in December in Salt Lake. Breaking down more barriers!

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