Give the Gift of Motivation and Inspiration!


Give the Gift of Motivation and Inspiration!

What could be better than passing on your enthusiasm!

The best is yet to come!

click here http://www.brucewconner.com

cover

Faster as a Master Your best is yet to come!

 

 

 

 

Buy my Book! Available now on Amazon!


Buy My Book! Faster as a Master, Breaking Down Barriers, Journeying Toward Wholeness. Available now on Amazon in print and kindle versions.

Happy Birthday to my wife Maripat.  Seven years ago today we met when you fell in my lap on the United company bus and I flew you from Chicago to Hong Kong.  Faster as a Master is dedicated to you and sharing this fantastic journey. Chapter 5 is the story of how we met.

Follow this link to Amazon and order the print on demand version or download the digital version.  For my international friends I would reccomend Amazon so you can get the best options and deals on shipping.

http://www.amazon.com/Faster-Master-Breaking-Journeying-Wholeness-ebook/dp/B00NMWLDRM/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1411310247&sr=8-2&keywords=faster+as+a+master

Description:

Bruce Conner is faster as a speed skater now, at age 57, than he was as a teenager. The commonly held belief about getting slower as we age has been blown completely out of the water by Bruce, breaking down that barrier. Getting better and going faster is more about intentions and choices than age. “We all want to be great. As I get older, I want to be great again. Happy, loved, healthy–those are the qualities I aspire to be. To be whole in body, mind, and spirit is the reward. We are more capable of attaining those things than we give ourselves credit for.” –Bruce ConnerBruce is also a United B-747 captain, even though he was told when he got his first pair of glasses at age 16 that he would never fly airplanes for a living. Bruce competed as a youngster from age 12 till 19, competing as a long track ice speed skater at the local, state, national, and international levels. He was on the U.S. national team from 1974 through 1976, barely missing making the 1976 Olympic team.

Returning after 20 plus years away from the sport, he had some unfinished business. How fast could he go if he trained as hard as a youth but was smarter about it? Making it back to the Olympic trials again at age 49 was his goal. To be in the elite group of the top skaters in this country was the prize. Was it possible? He had to find out.Bruce has now qualified for four US Olympic trials, at age 19, 49, 53, and 57. Find out how Bruce was able to compete at the elite level and, in the process, journey toward wholeness and heal old wounds. Follow Bruce to break down your barriers to an unlimited life!

I will have copies available to personalize later this week and will announce how to buy them directly from me.  I will be helping Nancy Swider-Peltz, Sr. at the Masters Long Track Clinic at the Pettit Center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin later this week and will have copies for purchase (save shipping).

I will be announcing soon how to purchase on iTunes and Nook digital versions.

This has been an amazing four and a half year journey getting this book wriiten and published, thanks for your support!

Next week I will pick up the discussion about “Mental Training”.

Faster as a Master

Faster as a Master

 

 

Press Release For Upcoming Olympic Trials


For Immediate Release From Bart Conner 1984 Olympic Champion 12/15/2013

At age 57 United Airlines 747 Captain Bruce Conner Qualifies for his 4th US Olympic Trials in Long Track Speed Skating.  Bruce Conner hopes to inspires others.

He has qualified at age 19, 49, 53 and now at 57, the oldest competitor ever.

For the 4th time in his life, Bruce Conner has qualified to skate with the best in the sport. Narrowly missing the Olympic team in 1975 at age 19, he retired from the sport and pursued his other passion, flying.  Now at the top of his field as a United 747 Captain, he flies all over the world.  His other full time job is training to compete at an elite level of competition.

He is skating faster than ever, and able to maintain a very high level of training and competition for 9 seasons in a row.  He will be competing in the 500 meter race on December 28th, and the 1000 meter race on December 29th, in Salt Lake City.

Nancy Swider – Peltz, Sr, has been his coach for the last 3 seasons.  Nancy is a four time Olympian, 8 time competitor of the Olympic trials, and former world record holder.  She also trains other Olympians. She says, “Bruce’s technical skill on the ice are close to perfectly efficient and surpasses all expectations I (or anyone else) would have for a 57 year old.  It is this, and his training discipline, that has brought him to the level of qualifying for the Olympic trials with the young guys in “what the books would say” are distances most difficult as you get older.”

Bruce trains 3 to 4 times per week on an indoor 400 meter track at the Pettit National  Ice Center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. It is a 150 mile round trip journey from his home in Kildeer, Illinois.

Conner”s family has experienced sports success in the past.  Bruce’s younger brother Bart is a 1984 two time Olympic Gold medalist in gymnastics.  Bart is married to Olympic Champion Nadia Comenici.

“The Trials are my Olympics.  I know that my times will not be fast enough to make the US team.  I consider this accomplishment a victory lap for all Master Athletes.”

Bruce’s accomplishments are a testament to his philosophy which is.

“Let age enhance your dreams rather than define them.”

“Getting better and going faster is more about intention and choice than age.”

For more information on Bruce Conner you can check out his website

http://www.brucewconner.com

For more info contact: Bruce Conner 847-370-5405

Masters World Sprints, Salt Lake City, March 2013

Masters World Sprints, Salt Lake City, March 2013

Book Jacket for “Faster As A Master”


Here is my book Jacket for “Faster As A Master

Bruce W. Conner is faster now, at age 57, as a speed skater, than when he was on the national team as a teenager.  After narrowly missing making the Olympic team in 1976 he hung up his skates.  After 22 years he came back to the sport he loved to complete unfinished business.  Bruce has competed in the Olympic trials at age 19, 49, 53, and 57.  As a masters athlete he holds numerous World Championships and World records.  The commonly held belief about getting slower as we age, has been blown completely out of the water by Bruce, breaking down that barrier.

Bruce has always said:

“Getting better and going faster is more about intention and choices than age.”

When Bruce set upon the journey to make it back to the Olympic trials he opened the door to a journey that would heal old wounds from his past and uncover a rich full meaningful life beyond his wildest dreams.

“Let age enhance your dreams, rather than define them”

Bruce Conner 2008

I have hired an editor and book designer.  We are working hard and hope to publish late this year.

Stay tuned…..

Photo by Jerry Search

Photo by Jerry Search

Training Intensity


When approaching the starting line this December for the Olympic trials, I will remember July.

My mantra that I repeat is:  Grateful to be here and skate, I have done the work, adjusting as I go, trusting to get the results I am supposed to have.

July:  I have done the work.

Having spent many years of working up to this, this is the peak of training volume and intensity.

Training everyday, working very hard, making progress.  The support system, preparation, food, equipment, coaching, sleep, recovery, therapy, all set me up to make progress.  Some of you race bikes, race and skate in-line, race triathlon, skate short track, etc.  Whatever it is you do, make it intense.  When approaching the starting line I remember the maximum effort bike ride,  the weight lifting to failure, the static skating position sits for many minutes.

My mental preparations are there for me in the last stages of my race.  When feeling the lactic acid hit my legs, when tunnel vision comes because of oxygen deprivation, I remember the intense work in July.  This is where the race is won.  The part of the journey that changes me into my better self.  Transformation by the work.  Revealing my true character and what I am on this earth to do.

Make it a great July with progress in volume and intensity. Serious, fun, and inspirational to others, be an example.

Can’t wait for ice in Milwaukee in 4 weeks.  Happy dance!!!

Resting with the satisfaction of a job well done, in the bank for the coming season.

Flying my first trip after finishing training on the B-777, onward and upward!

At the starting line

At the starting line

Olympic Trials here I come !


US Speed Skating has published the rules for the upcoming Olympic Trials.  My goal last season was to qualify for the trials.  Each year the rules must change to reflect the current dates and places for each competition.  Additionally, the rules for Olympic trials and team selection must be published every 4 years (see the link below for the document).  The Long Track Trials will be held  December 27th, 2013 through January 1st, 2014, in Salt Lake City.  The Short Track Trials will be January 2nd through 4th 2014, also in Salt Lake.  NBC sports will be airing 17 hours of coverage (some of it will be live) of the long and short track trials.  This will be a great build up to the Olympic games in Sochi during February, 2014

Last season I set out to qualify for 3 distances, 500, 1000, and 1500.  I made the time for the 500 (39.00) in January, in Milwaukee.  I skated faster 2 more times in Salt Lake (38.94 and 38.75).  I needed a 1:16.08 in the 1000.  I skated a 1:16.15, missing the time by .07 or about 1 meter.  The rules allow me to skate both the 500 and the 1000 since I achieved the time in the 500.  I skated my second fastest 1500 ever at 2:01.40 in March but fell short of the required time of 1:57.96.  In retrospect, that goal was not realistic.  The overall goal of making it to the trials was realistic and I achieved it!

Having the rules published is the final validation of my goals.  Now I am set to go and compete.  My goal is to improve on my performance from the last trials 4 years ago.  I know this will be my last Olympic trials.  This is my choice.  At the last trials I was 53 and the oldest ever to qualify for this event.  I have just added 4 years to my record.  I am faster now by far as a master than I was as a teenager on the national team.  I do the work and get the results.  I have enjoyed the journey along the way too, appreciating all the work and benefits that come my way.

I have only 3 days left of simulator training in Denver this week to finish my B-777 type rating school.  This is my 29th year at United Airlines.  This will be my fifth type rating, all in Boeing aircraft.  I started out at a B-727 engineer, yes they had those in the day.  I am proud to be a Captain at United Airlines.  Looks like I will be going to Shanghai next weekend and then to Europe a few days later to finish my line training with a friend of mine that is an instructor Captain.   In July I will start flying out of Washington Dulles to Frankfurt.  Onward to my new assignment.
“Let age enhance your dreams rather than define them.”  Bruce Conner 2008
“Getting better and going faster is more about intentions and choices than age”

Bruce Conner  2012

Photo by Steve Penland

Photo by Steve Penland

Link for USS Document

http://usspeedskating.org/sites/default/files/14%20OWG%20SSK%20LT%20ATH%20-%20Procedures%20and%20All%20Attachments%20-%20June%205%202013%20-%20FINAL%20AND%20SIGNED_0.pdf

Rest, Recover, and Reflect


Now that my training and competition season is over, it is time to rest, recover, and reflect.

This season has been hard, physically, mentally, and emotionally.  I need to respect the recovery of all three.

First, the physical rest.  I have managed to increase my volume and intensity of training very gradually over the years, and this season.  Working into my off-season I need to be gentle with myself.  Stopping suddenly, my body will revolt.  I have experience with this.  Stopping before, due to injury, I have paid the price.  My legs don’t get what they are used to for activity, my hamstrings tighten up and pull my lower back out of alignment.  That is just one of the symptoms of a poor recovery process. Taking a couple of days off, then easy biking and stretching for the next couple of weeks.  I am giving my body the best chance at recovery.  It seems to take a certain amount of low intensity heartbeats to get the job done.  Waking up the other day to the thought of playing tennis was refreshing.  Tennis can be hard on me physically but getting the activity, doing something different, is part of my recovery.  Golf, walking, easy jogging with our dog Lilly, swimming, yoga are some of the things I can do for rest and recovery.  A few weeks of this and I will be ready to increase to hard levels of training.

That is the physical.  The mental and emotional rest and recovery is not so cut and dried.  I need to listen to myself for the direction.  Pumped after a great season I want to go hard again.  The danger arises when I run out of gas physically, mentally or emotionally later during the training season because I have not rested enough, or taken a long enough break to be hungry again.

Reflection on the season and my goals are also essential.  Setting out to qualify for the upcoming Olympic trials, I met my goal in the 500 meter race.  Three races skated at 39.00 (the standard) or better, improving as the season progressed.  In the 1000, finished my last race with my seasons best 1:16.15.  Needing a 1:16.08,  I missed by about 3 feet.  Qualifying next fall is still possible.  Leaving everything on the ice, I am very happy with my result.  In the 1500 I missed by 3.44 seconds.  The 1500 was not a realistic goal and that is ok.   I was proud of the only 1500 I raced this year, the second fastest ever for me, and the consistent laps.  I will concentrate on the 1000 this coming season.  The 3000 this year I skated was for fun and the last 4 laps were progressively faster.  What worked, and what did not, is also essential during the review of the season.  Building on my strengths, correcting the mistakes, moving forward.

Recognizing my support network and sharing the rewards with everyone involved in my success is a joy.  My wife Maripat, my father Harold, my coach Nancy are all indispensable players in my journey.  I hope they know how much I appreciate their help and share in “our” success.

Onward to new goals, being patient with resting, and giving my legs and my head a well deserved rest.

Racing results for me are available at http://www.speedskatingresults.com/index.php?p=17&s=4067

Our Lab and a half Lilly ready to run.

Our Lab and a half Lilly ready to run.