Coaching


Mirrors are amazing devices. In my physical training, my coach and I frequently use mirrors to adjust my body position. Yet, I use mirrors in a figurative way as well. A coach is like a mirror. When we can see ourselves through the eyes of a coach, change becomes possible and probable. In contrast, trying to be my own expert has been disastrous for me. Selecting someone who can help me along my path is very important. Such a guide needs to be a good fit. I have had several coaches in my life in speed skating as well as other endeavors and no there is doubt I will have more. This coaching idea can be applied to any part of my life, the principles are universal. I trust that each coach who has come along has been the right one at the right time for my learning process.
The coach-athlete relationship needs to embody a certain synchronicity. Everyone puts out a certain vibration, and I’ve learned that following my gut and being sensitive to that feeling when picking a coach is very important. This will help the relationship grow, flourish, and be good for both of us. That is the goal in a perfect world. The real world is very different, but we must continually strive to obtain what we need.
The first question to ask when considering coaching is, “Am I coach-able?” This will be a rudimentary question for some and a very difficult one for others. I have been at opposite ends of this spectrum in different parts of my life. As a youngster, I attended a few summer camps to learn about skating and training. I had a correspondence relationship with a couple of coaches. One was Dutch and one was Norwegian. We wrote letters that took weeks to deliver. By learning as much as I could, I became my own expert. Because I developed some hard and fast rules for my training, I became unshakable in most of my ideas and was not very coach-able at the time.
Years later as a masters skater, I realized I had a lot of knowledge and expertise. I had wisdom based on my life experiences and was an expert on many things, but there was still some blockage where coaching was concerned. I was not moving forward as well as I could, so I accepted that I could not see myself as well as a coach could. I was becoming open to new ideas about how to do things, and I was now ready to listen to a coach.
My current coach says that I am very coach-able. To me, this means I am willing to hear what she has to say and try it to the best of my ability. I no longer feel that I have to justify what I am doing, just try to do it differently. This attitude has taken a long time to adopt. My ability to do so is connected to my improved self-esteem. The better we feel about ourselves, the easier it is to change. That’s what being coach-able is all about.
The coach-athlete relationship is similar to a family relationship in many ways. In order for it to work well and flourish, it must be given the priority of just below family.
Proximity is important in any relationship. Long distances are possible in coach-athlete relationships, but they can be hard. There is no substitute for looking into someone’s eyes and seeing their body language to get the feedback that a coach needs to make adjustments. Having a coach who can be on the scene is the best arrangement. When you are willing to do the work of finding and fostering a coach-athlete relationship, the benefits outweigh the costs every time.
Communication between a coach and an athlete is the only way an athlete can make progress. In order for the communication to be effective, I must be absolutely honest with myself first, then with my coach. My career in aviation has helped me to see what effective communication can do. To pass on those lessons, I will explain what I know works for me in the coach-athlete relationship.
For effective communication to take place, people must follow some essential steps. First, the idea must be verbalized. This verbalization must be done in a constructive way. The next step is timing. The information must take place when the athlete is attentive. If my coach yells something at me when I am totally focused on my performance, hearing is impossible. As a dad and soccer coach, I remember never to shout anything to the boy with the ball during a game. Talking to the boys without the ball is more effective. In addition, if the athlete is alert and attentive, then he or she has a better chance of hearing what the coach is trying to get across.
Conversely, as an athlete, I need to pay attention to what my coach is trying to get across to me. There is no harm in saying, “ Sorry, I could not hear you, say again?” or “What did you say? I could not listen till now.”
But for true communication to take place, the people involved must have a meaningful exchange. As a coach, you want some insightful response back from your athlete. If my coach tries to convey a point of technique to me, then says “Do you understand?” and I respond with a yes or a nod, she has no way of telling whether any real ideas were exchanged. On the other hand, if I say something meaningful or insightful back or if I physically demonstrate understanding, my coach knows I absorbed her point.
To sum up, it is important to communicate clearly, honestly, and when the listener is available to really listen. Then make sure that something meaningful and insightful is the result of the exchange. Everyone communicates differently. It is up to me, as an athlete, to make sure that I effectively take in what my coach is trying to get across to me. It is in my interest to have a coach and my responsibility to make the relationship work.

Find and foster a coach-athlete relationship and the rewards will great!

Here is my coach giving me split times on the backstretch and encouragement!

Here is my coach giving me split times on the back-stretch and encouragement!

Coaching


Coaching ourselves does not work. Yes, we need to make decisions about ourselves. A mirror to see myself, make changes. That is the way it works Experimenting with the idea that I can be my own expert has backfired more than once. Someone that can help me along my path is essential. This relationship needs to be a good fit. Several coaches have helped along in my life. Trusting that each coach that comes at the right time for my learning process has helped. There needs to be a certain synchronicity in the relationship. Everyone puts out a certain vibration. I need to be sensitive to that so the relationship will grow, flourish, and be good for both me and my coach. Following my gut when I pick a coach is very important.

The first question I must ask myself is, “Am I coachable?” This may seem like a rudimentary question. We find ourselves at opposite ends of the spectrum in different times of our lives. As a youngster I went to a couple of summer camps to learn about skating and training. I met some expert coaches and started to write to them for training programs. They were Norwegian and Dutch and we wrote letters that took weeks to deliver.  Geographically not being close to any coaches, I learned as much as possible, and became my own expert.  Part of this result was that I developed some hard rules for my training. Unshakable in most of my ideas, I was not very coachable at the time.

An expert on many things, but still having some blockage about many ideas. Wanting to moving forward, I needed to have an attitude of acceptance and change. Accepting that I could not see myself as well as a coach could, was the ticket to progress. Open to new ideas was the key to the door.

Nancy Swider- Peltz, Sr. , my current coach, tells me that I am very coachable. Being willing to hear what she has to say, and try it to the best of my ability is my attitude. No longer having to justify my actions or thoughts, I just try to do things differently. This attitude has taken a long time to sink in. It probably ties in with my self esteem. The better I feel about myself the easier change is possible. Nancy recognizes that and helps me with that process. That is what being coachable is all about.

Nancy and I have a good fit, and we are very productive. What I bring to this relationship is good for both of us. I know and trust that.

Some of us do not have the resources for a coach. We may be held back due to finances, or geography, etc. My reccommendation is to attend as many summer camps and clinics as possible. Develop as many contacts as possible and foster those relationships. Being open to new ideas from all sources. Online capabilities are growing as well. Instant feedback may not be possible, but video, texting, email, etc, can all be tools to help your progress. We are only limited by our own imagination. Good Luck!

American Cup Salt lake, March, 2013, Nancy Swider-Peltz, Sr.  giving race splits and encouragement!
American Cup Salt lake, March, 2013, Nancy Swider-Peltz, Sr. giving race splits and encouragement!

Coaching


Happy Easter Everyone !!!

Coaching myself does not work, for me. I need a mirror so that I can see myself and make changes. That is the way it works best for me. Having experimented with the idea that I can be my own expert has backfired more than once. The need to select someone that can help me along my path is essential. This relationship needs to be a good fit. Several coaches have helped along in my life. Trusting that each coach that comes at the right time for my learning process has helped. There needs to be a certain synchronicity in the relationship. Everyone puts out a certain vibration. I need to be sensitive to that so the relationship will grow, flourish, and be good for both me and my coach. Following my gut when I pick a coach is very important.

The first question I must ask myself as I go along this path is, “Am I coachable?” This may seem like a rudimentary question. I have been at opposite ends of the spectrum in different times of my life. As a youngster I went to a couple of summer camps to learn about skating and training. Having met some expert coaches then, I started to write to them for training programs. They were Norwegian and Dutch and we wrote letters that took weeks to deliver. Not having any money to spend on coaching was a problem too. Geographically not being close to any coaches, I learned as much as possible, and became my own expert. As a result, I developed some hard rules for my training. Unshakable in most of my ideas, I was not very coachable at the time. After crashing and burning from overtraining as a teenager, slowly over a couple decades, I realized I needed to change my thinking. Knowledge, expertise, and wisdom based on my life experiences were assets now. I might be an expert on many things, but I was still having some blockage about many ideas. Wanting to moving forward, I needed to have an attitude of acceptance and change. Accepting that I could not see myself as well as a coach could, was the ticket to progress. Open to new ideas, and the ability to spend some money on a coach opened the door.

Nancy Swider- Peltz, Sr. , my current coach, tells me that I am very coachable. Being willing to hear what she has to say, and try it to the best of my ability is my attitude. No longer having to justify what I am doing, I just try to do it differently. This attitude has taken a long time to sink in. It probably ties in with my self esteem. The better I feel about myself the easier change is possible. Nancy recognizes that and helps me with that process. That is what being coachable is all about.

Nancy and I have a relationship almost like family. I treat it with almost the same in terms of time and energy. In order for it to work well and flourish it must be given the priority it deserves. I am very grateful for what we have and how it works. It is a good fit, and we are very productive. What I bring to this relationship is good for both of us. I know and trust that.

Some of us do not have the resources for a coach. We may be held back due to finances, or geography, etc. My reccommendation is to attend as many summer camps and clinics as possible. Develop as many contacts as possible and foster those relationships. Being open to new ideas from all sources. Online capabilities are growing as well. Instant feedback may not be possible, but video, texting, email, etc, can all be tools to help your progress. We are only limited by our own imagination. Good Luck!

American Cup Salt lake, March, 2013, Nancy Swider-Peltz, Sr.  giving race splits and encouragement!

American Cup Salt lake, March, 2013, Nancy Swider-Peltz, Sr. giving race splits and encouragement!